Fermented Garlic Can Help Eliminate most Bacteria, Fungi & other Harmful Microorganisms

By now, we already know that garlic is healthy and good for us, but did you know that the fermented garlic is more nutritious than the raw one?

According to studies, fermentation increases the healing capacity of garlic and its bioavailability.

The nutrients in fermented foods make it easy for the body to digest and absorb them.

Although you can still eat it raw, it can be very beneficial for your health to consume it fermented too.

Below, learn about the amazing advantages of fermented garlic.

The Benefits of Fermented Garlic

According to one study, fermented garlic had higher antioxidant power, i.e.13 times higher than regular garlic.

Fermented garlic was also found to be rich in hydrogen peroxide which is beneficial in the fight against fungi, viruses, and bacteria. This is why fermented garlic can be consumed as a potent natural antibiotic.

Further on, back in 2004, one study published in the Agricultural and Food Chemistry journal found that the pickled garlic with brine fermentation was richer in nutrients than raw garlic.

It increased the amino acids, riboflavin, glutamic acid, and arginine the most.

If you want to try it out, here’s the recipe.

Fermented Garlic Recipe

You’ll need:

3 garlic heads

Filtered water

Kosher salt

Non-iodized salt like kosher

The prep:

Peel the cloves and fill up one Mason jar. Leave an inch and a half space at the top.

Make the salt brine by dissolving the salt in the water. For each cup of water, use half a tsp of salt. Then add the brine to the cloves.

Close it lightly and put it on the counter. Open the jar every day once to enable the fermentation.

It will begin in several days when you notice small bubbles and the change in color of the brine- it will develop a golden-brown one.

You can keep on the fermentation for a month or more. When it’s ready, close it firmly and store it in the fridge.

You now have your own fermented garlic- you can combine it with so many different meals.

Sources:

ANYA VIEN

CULTURED FOOD LIFE

THE SPRUCE EATS

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